Reputation Management: Onesheet and Rick Santorum

Onesheet went into beta today. It looks awesome and even better, doesn’t require the band to maintain it. Here’s how Onesheet describes their service:

Onesheet allows musicians to set up a web presence in minutes using content from other websites they’re already updating. They simply connect their existing social networks and services immediately have a website full of content already posted across the web: music, videos, photos, concert dates, blogs, social streams, mailing list signups, online stores and more.

So what you get is a beautiful splash page for your band which aggregates information from all the other places you update.

Why is this awesome?

A key component of “reputation management” is the process of creating visibility for your band or business or self to the exclusion of negative, misleading or otherwise uncontrollable information sources.

Perhaps the greatest all-time reputation management FAIL is Rick Santorum. Google “santorum” and you’ll see why a single website contributes to undermining the viability of the ex-Senator as a Presidential candidate.

So, Onesheet is the kind of service that can be used to fill up that first page of Google results. If you control ten different websites or online presences for your band or business or self, and can push those to the first page of results, it excludes any potential negative listings. That’s a key element of reputation management.

Try this: Google yourself (c’mon you know you’ve done it). What do you see? Facebook, LinkedIn, Quora, Twitter? Is there anything negative there? Creating new profiles at different services like Onesheet will help you avoid getting into the same frothy mess as Rick Santorum, and help effectively manage your online reputation.